Environment

The Groundfridge is a self-sustainable invention for modern citizens

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You may not have heard of Floris Schoonderbeek yet, and that’s a shame because this Dutch inventor is going to make the world a more self-sustainable place for all of us. We’re not just talking about cutting back on that electric bill and reducing your carbon footprint. The kind of innovations coming from Schoonderbeek and his Netherlands-based company, Weltevree, are meant to meet the requirements of people who want to grow and store their own food in the most self-sustainable way possible. Which is where the Groundfridge comes into play.

Groundfridge

Image: Weltevree/Floris Schoonderbeek

Immediately the image that the “Groundfridge” brings to mind is of a fridge underground. And that’s essentially all that the Groundfridge is: a unit that can be buried with dirt and moved from one location to the next with relative ease. We’re not entirely sure about that last part, but, either way, this innovative take on a traditional root cellar is surely going to change the landscape of gardening. With all of the people taking care of rooftop gardens and finding other ways to grow their own food, the ability to have a unit under the earth keeping your food naturally cool in a spacious setting is like a dream come true.

But the Groundfridge isn’t the only thing that Floris Schoonderbeek has invented in an effort to reduce man’s reliance on electricity. Schoonderbeek’s previous invention, the Dutchtub, drew fame from being a hot tub that drew heat directly from a wood burning stove. The entire thing is portable, so you can soak on the beach, your patio, really anywhere it’s legal to do so.

Schoonderbeek has an entire collection of items available for sale at Welvetree, from outdoor furniture and accessories to stoves, socket lights and string lights.

Sara is an editorial intern from MTSU, and an almost double major in journalism and English because she can't make up her mind. When she isn't studying or trying not to die on highway 840, Sara works on her novella and her thesis on Gothic Victorian literature, showers her dog with kisses and waits for the next Lana Del Rey album. While watching American Horror Story on repeat.